The Leverhulme Trust Lectures

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Attendance at these events is free, however places are limited so early booking is advisable. Please email crfr.events@ed.ac.uk to reserve a place, stating clearly which seminar(s) you wish to attend.


Young people´s human rights and well-being: the forms of resistance and children’s participation in South America

4 October 2017, 3pm-4.30pm
Godfrey  Thomson Hall, Patersons  Land, Moray  House  School of  Education, The University  of  Edinburgh

South America is a diverse continent where challenges affect the well-being of children and young people. This lecture examines the strong remnants of oligarchical power that favor the upper classes in political structures. It examines the impacts of poverty, violence, and the current crises of governance in the region on the lives of young people. This will be done in the context of the children´s rights established by law in the 1990s including their rights to participate in decisions about their lives. Finally, it describes efforts at reform of children’s policies and practices.


Reflections on children’s rights in Brazil and South America

5 October 2017, 2.00pm-3.30pm
The Court Room, The University of Stirling

Children, thought of in the context of human rights, have become a very important issue in South America. This has been especially true since the approval of children’s rights laws in the 1990s. Before these events, most countries in the region had gone through twenty years of brutal military dictatorship and the countries were eager to see the institutionalization of democratic practices on many fronts. In the 1980s a burst of social mobilization sought to recognize people’s rights. Interestingly, children became one of the most powerful foci of these social movements, especially marginalized children. So-called street children, for example, became a particular focus of attention. In this lecture I will explore the ideas behind the promise of citizenship to children, particularly in Brazil, focusing on the discourse connected to what was promised and what the law and policies actually accomplished.


Children and the city – methodologies for listening to children

27 October 2017, 3.30pm-5.00pm
Perth College, University of the Highlands and Islands

Based on a photo exhibit named ‘Contrasts: The Children of Rio de Janeiro’ that featured children in diverse neighborhoods, we have experimented with using photos from the exhibit to engage children in conversations and various forms of active participation in several Rio schools. We have been experimenting with methodological approaches, extracting silhouettes of the photographs and inviting the children to imagine and recreate the full scene according to their own designs. These workshops promote graphic expression and many conversations and games about the delights and problems of the city in which the children live. The goal was to reflect on what methodologies nurture connections among researchers, teachers, and children and allows new insights to be gained. The results of this study build on literature that focuses on what research with meaningful children’s participation
should involve. This lecture will focus on
reflections that emerged from this experience.


Young People’s Perceptions of Urban Violence in Brazil and Mexico

14  November 2017, 4.30pm-6pm
Dalhousie Building 3G02 Lecture Theatre  1, The University of Dundee

In times of rapid change and setbacks in young people’s human rights, it is particularly relevant to consult their opinions and perceptions regarding experiences of violence in their lives. Young people living in poverty are exposed to exceptionally high levels of violence. These individuals are also frequently portrayed as criminals and are the targets of punitive and repressive measures in urban centres throughout the world. This lecture addresses the impact of violence on the lives of young people living in contexts of urban violence in Latin America.


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